Sarah Stodola

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Sarah is the founder and editor of Flung, the author of Process: The Writing Lives of Great Authors, and a widely published travel and culture writer. Follow her on Twitter or Instagram.

Posts by Sarah Stodola 123 results

The Swimming Holes that Were Worth the Trek

There are pursuits in life that work better in the abstract. I'm thinking here of things like "sleeping under the stars" and "IKEA hacks." The things that seem like a great idea until you try them. Hold that thought while I tell you that I am easily taken by the notion of a good swimming hole. There’s a primal satisfaction to be derived from ...

How To Navigate Ride-Hailing in Singapore (and all of Southeast Asia)

When it comes to world travel, Uber and its orbit of competing ride-hailing apps have introduced a new ease into getting from point A to point B in unfamiliar places. No longer do you need to know how to get where you’re headed, speak the local language, nor even to have any local currency on you to get there. In addition, there’s an added ...

The Hotel Pool Enters Politics (This One Is a Trump Supporter)

Before the plan emerged for me to come here for two weeks, I knew little about Singapore. I had a sense of powerhouse Asian megacities only in the abstract, and my generalizations of them ran toward the overly sterile, overly materialistic, full of suits and really expensive cocktails. I knew Singapore was a fast-paced economic hub, and I knew it ...

NYC –> Guangzhou in China Southern’s Business Class

In Flight Reviews, Flung writers provide key information about flights they take in order to leave the flying public better informed in an age of frustration, obfuscation and increasingly unfriendly skies. JFK –> LHR on Flight CZ300, Business Class Flight: China Airlines CZ300 Date and Time of Flight: Saturday, October 7th at 11:15 ...

The Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa: Where’s the There?

Some travel is enjoyed, some endured. And then some of it simply confounds. Rolling up to the Borgata Hotel Casino & Spa in Atlantic City ranks as a strange—and discomfiting—example of the latter category. Located in the city’s Marina District, which is not so much a district as a lonely marsh, the complex defies logic and understood ...

The Great Passport Photo Fail of 2017

We’ve all been around technology long enough now to know that even as it can improve our daily lives, it can also add untold headaches. Such is the lesson to keep in mind as I recount my journey this past summer to produce a photograph worthy—by the standards of the US Government—of representing me in my new passport. The journey was ...

13 Fall Shoes for Wandering the World’s Cities

For me, "travel shoe" has never meant running shoe or Teva. Maybe because in my early travel years I tended to travel to great world cities, I always wanted to look like I belonged in that cosmopolitan place, even as I ogled the must-see sights will other the other tourists. So fashion-conscious, yes, but I'm still heel-averse, and have therefore ...

Democrats and Republicans Are Even Divided on Travel

In this weird moment we’re living through, United States citizens find themselves increasingly divided by their politics, and those differences extend to our travel preferences. According to a new survey commissioned by The Cashlorette, a finance blog for women owned by Bankrate, our preferred destinations correspond with our political leanings ...

Rockaway Once Boasted the World’s Largest Hotel

New York City is known for a lot of things, but beach destination isn't generally one of them. When I moved to New York City at age 23, for example, I didn't know that one of the city's borders happened to be with the Atlantic Ocean. It took me a couple of years to fully comprehend the concept of taking the subway to the beach. I certainly ...

Can Group Travel Work for the Independent Woman?

I love traveling solo. Ever since those three months I spent in Europe with a backpack and a Eurail Pass when I was 22, I’ve thrived on the unmediated adventure, the open possibilities, and even the occasional loneliness that comes with heading to far-flung places on my own. Traveling with a posse was never my thing, and I was always bemused by ...

We Need To Travel Better

Two Sundays ago, as Donald Trump's advisers were convincing him to read a prepared statement condemning an act of Nazi terrorism that he would override a day later with history's least dignified press conference, my boyfriend and I hosted a barbecue at which one guest was from Barcelona. We talked first about the charms of Barcelona, then about ...

Oheka Castle: Stomping Ground of F. Scott Fitzgerald and Taylor Swift

In the summer of 1922, F. Scott Fitzgerald sat every day in the sun-dappled studio above the garage of his and Zelda’s Long Island house and laid down the foundations of his novel, The Great Gatsby. He was drawing on life as he saw it around him, in those enclaves on Long Island Sound where the richest people in the world built the biggest ...

Jordan’s Other Magnificent Ancient City

Petra gets all the glory, but there’s another ancient city in Jordan with serious capacity to awe. Jerash, located just 30 miles north of the capital city of Amman, is a sprawling, incredibly well-preserved ancient Roman metropolis. The ruins, including a food market, a main street, a water fountain that supplied the entire population, and ...

How ‘The Bachelor’ and ‘Bachelorette’ Embraced the Travel Industry

The Bachelor and Bachelorette franchise has seen its share of coverage in the media, think-pieces deconstructing what it all means, bloggers dedicated to revealing spoilers, and recaps analyzing each week’s actions and decisions. The show has been parodied (Burning Love) and it’s been fictionalized (Unreal). All of these characterizations miss ...

El Caminito: Buenos Aires’ Least Intriguing Attraction

Every guide to Buenos Aires, and I mean every guide, recommends a visit to El Caminito in La Boca. Many of them even feature the colorful street on their covers, despite an afternoon spent there being the surest way to avoid anything real about culture in Buenos Aires. El Caminito isn't Buenos Aires; it's Buenos Aires tourism. Nobody lives in ...

A Guide to the Brooklyn Navy Yard

For most of my nearly 17 years living in Brooklyn, the old Navy Yard here remained a mystery—that 300-acre hulk of fenced-off land that made a straight shot between Fort Greene, where I lived, and Williamsburg, where I spent my twenties hanging out, impossible. Opened in 1806, the Brooklyn Navy Yard became one of the most important naval ...

The 5 Best Back Gardens in Brooklyn

Despite its rise to global prominence over the past decade, Brooklyn still exists on a smaller scale than Manhattan. This extends to its restaurants (with the exception of prime Williamsburg locations), which often inhabit the ground floor of century-old brownstones. At their best, the gardens of these buildings whisk visitors away from the city ...

Fort Greene’s Mettā: The Chef’s Counter Is Everything

On one of the more picturesque corners in Brooklyn, a new restaurant called Mettā opened this past March with a menu it describes as “sustainably sourced, vegetable forward.” As a vegetarian living amidst a Brooklyn restaurant scene that seems ever-more hostile toward vegetarians, I had some skin in the game of testing that description. On a ...

Packing for a Camping Trip: How To Do It Right

I’ll confess that I didn’t start camping in any real way until I got together with my boyfriend seven years ago. Our first weekend trip together involved Vermont, some marital nuptials (not ours), and a pleasantly creaky B&B. Our second, a few weeks later, took us to a campsite upstate on the shore of Mongaup Pond. It seems to be that ...