Sarah Stodola

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Sarah is the founder and editor of Flung, the author of Process: The Writing Lives of Great Authors, and a widely published travel and culture writer. Follow her on Twitter or Instagram.

Posts by Sarah Stodola 111 results

Nights and Weekends in Greenpoint, Brooklyn

Before you order your first drink, the cash-only policy very well may lead you to the ATM sticking out of an old London phone booth just outside of this rebelliously shaped bar, sitting in the middle of an equally rebellious three-way intersection. It's the first of many quirks. Another is that inside a New York City building, there are never ...

Home of the Brave in Greenpoint, Brooklyn

This pleasantly de-saturated home shop on Greenpoint’s Franklin Avenue has a lot going for it: beautiful inventory, an easy layout that encourages browsing, and a location in a stretch of Greenpoint that’s a treat to explore, with its happy mix of industrial activity and a palatable strain of hipster. It's an offshoot of clothing and accesso...

Which Ride-Hailing App Should You Use In New York City?

Editor's Note: We updated this article on October 21, 2016 and again on April 23, 2017. The ride-hailing app world is a fast moving one, and on both occasions we had some changes to report.Navigating New York City has become a different beast in recent years—with the advent of Citibikes and Uber, all of a sudden options for getting from ...

For Keepsake: The Things I’ve Brought Home

Quite some time ago, having just turned 21, I traveled with my dad to Tanzania, where he’d once lived. It was the first trip of my life that could reasonably qualify as exotic, even with my father leading the way. After a layover, we flew on an enormous, nearly empty plane from Amsterdam to Dar es Salaam and endured the most convulsive turbule...

A Slice of Old Paris at the Hotel Langlois

There’s something weird going on with Paris hotels, I gradually concluded as I conducted the research for a place to stay for four September nights. At a certain price point of $300-ish per night, the aesthetic leaves classic Paris behind for something that would be more at home at South Beach circa turn of the millennium—flat shiny surfaces ...

Following Hemingway to the Met’s Cézanne Gallery

Perhaps no other American author has had his writing style more widely examined, more often imitated, and more intensively deconstructed than Ernest Hemingway. No one seems able to get their head around the intricacy he brings about via such simplicity. Hemingway used only the most necessary words, then pared them down even further. He employed ...

The World’s Best Works of Contemporary Public Art

Public art can be tricky business. In the wrong hands, it becomes just another part of the corporate milieu, or succumbs to heavy-handed propaganda. But done right, it adds something memorable to the city- or landscape in which it resides. It informs, inspires, entertains, sends an unexplained chill down the spine.Here are nine of our ...

10 Great Works of Literature about Florida

The best books about Florida tend toward what are arguably that state's sleaziest features--its seedy backwaters (literal and other), its wayward characters, its activities of dubious legality. In other words, you won't find a reflection of your retired grandparents' condo anywhere in this literature (unless your grandparents are seriously ...

A Guide To the Old Florida Charms of Matlacha

One of the undermentioned milestones for adults in middle-class America today comes as their parents make their inevitable migration to Florida. For me, it began in my mid-thirties, when mine bought a condo in Venice, on the state’s Gulf Coast. At first, it was a couple months in the winter, but expanded quickly. Now, just a few years later, my ...

7 Ways To Lower Your Travel Carbon Footprint

There's something pretty near to a consensus out there that travel in general is great, everyone should do it, etc. But this ignores the seedy underbelly of the industry: Travel is terrible for the environment. It accounts, as Travel & Leisure points out in this month's issue, for 2 percent of global carbon emissions. Kudos to T&L for ...

Not a Religious Experience (But Also, Sort of, Having One)

My plane from New York landed in Tel Aviv on a Friday afternoon, and after settling into our hotel, my boyfriend and I walked pretty immediately across the street and down to the Mediterranean Sea, that body of water that was until then so firmly planted in my imagination as a glamorous playground of the West. There, along with the volleyball ...

5 Countries that Do Breakfast Right

They say it's the most important meal of the day. It also happens to be my favorite meal of the day, and one I'd gladly trade lunch or dinner for. When traveling, there's nothing I love more than to linger over a well-done version that I'm less familiar with. Here are five interesting, amazing breakfasts to be had around the world...  ...

Frozen: A Night at the Ice Hotel

There was a wave of disappointment to be dealt with, first things first, when I arrived at the Ice Hotel in Jukkasjärvi, Sweden. One hundred and twenty-five miles north of the Arctic Circle, it was a location that held otherworldly promise, the kind of place where the Northern Lights are commonplace and you can get to the airport via dogsled. I ...

The Donna Camilla Savelli: 17th Century, Breathing and Echoing

One of the qualities by which a hotel should be measured, but often isn’t, involves the extent to which it immerses the visitor in its particular locale. If we are visiting a place, we may as well experience it, right? With this understanding in mind, over the past few years hoteliers have begun bringing local cuisine, art and design elements ...

San Augustinillo: The Town Next To the Town (Next To the Town)

I’d seen the word “Oaxaca” in writing many times before I ever bothered to consider its pronunciation, much less what it represented. I chose unfortunate company in which to finally grow curious. What’s this word? I asked a group of surfers with whom I worked one summer at a taco shack, and was met with a level of guffawing and scorn that ...

Mornings at Primo Passo Coffee Co.: LA Theater

It was my first morning in Los Angeles and I was sleeping on my college best friend’s pullout sofa in Santa Monica. Or, not sleeping, to take it out of the theoretical. I forget that I get jetlag when I travel from New York City to LA, or vice versa, even though it happens every time, and more intensively the older I get. So I lay there at ...

Art Deco Dissonance in Tuscany

We’d been floating around Tuscany for a few days and, honestly, chose the town of Montepulciano as our next stop based merely on the obvious fact that it had given its name to the famous Italian wine. You need something to go on when navigating Tuscany, because no choice is a wrong one, every village is as intriguing as the last, a medieval ...

Temples of Finance: 6 Historical Sites that Made the World Go ‘Round

Contracts, borrowing, debt, business practices. These may not typically be words we care to ponder while traveling, but over the course of history they are just the things that helped forge some of the world's most fascinating places. From an early European mint to a once-massive Chinese bank to the home of one of the most famous banking families ...

The Balenciaga Museum and Fashion as Art

Fifteen miles west of San Sebastian along the coast of northern Spain’s Basque region sits a small fishing village called Getaria. When it is known, it’s for a couple of things: its Txakoli, a lightly sparkling white wine unique to the region and served in the charming seafood restaurants to be found in the old town; and as the birthplace of ...

4 Mexico City Museums for the Bucket List

Of the many things that struck me during a recent visit to Mexico City—the food, the traffic, the way art is woven so intricately into the city’s fabric—nothing made more of an impression than the museums. There are a staggering number of them, 150 or so, and I went to a lot, double digits, yet made only a dent.Mexico City has so many ...