Sarah Stodola

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Sarah is the founder and editor of Flung, the author of Process: The Writing Lives of Great Authors, and a widely published travel and culture writer. Follow her on Twitter or Instagram.

Posts by Sarah Stodola 120 results

5 Countries that Do Breakfast Right

They say it's the most important meal of the day. It also happens to be my favorite meal of the day, and one I'd gladly trade lunch or dinner for. When traveling, there's nothing I love more than to linger over a well-done version that I'm less familiar with. Here are five interesting, amazing breakfasts to be had around the world...   ...

Frozen: A Night at the Ice Hotel

There was a wave of disappointment to be dealt with, first things first, when I arrived at the Ice Hotel in Jukkasjärvi, Sweden. One hundred and twenty-five miles north of the Arctic Circle, it was a location that held otherworldly promise, the kind of place where the Northern Lights are commonplace and you can get to the airport via dogsled. I ...

The Donna Camilla Savelli: 17th Century, Breathing and Echoing

One of the qualities by which a hotel should be measured, but often isn’t, involves the extent to which it immerses the visitor in its particular locale. If we are visiting a place, we may as well experience it, right? With this understanding in mind, over the past few years hoteliers have begun bringing local cuisine, art and design elements ...

San Augustinillo: The Town Next To the Town (Next To the Town)

I’d seen the word “Oaxaca” in writing many times before I ever bothered to consider its pronunciation, much less what it represented. I chose unfortunate company in which to finally grow curious. What’s this word? I asked a group of surfers with whom I worked one summer at a taco shack, and was met with a level of guffawing and scorn that ...

Mornings at Primo Passo Coffee Co.: LA Theater

It was my first morning in Los Angeles and I was sleeping on my college best friend’s pullout sofa in Santa Monica. Or, not sleeping, to take it out of the theoretical. I forget that I get jetlag when I travel from New York City to LA, or vice versa, even though it happens every time, and more intensively the older I get. So I lay there at ...

Art Deco Dissonance in Tuscany

We’d been floating around Tuscany for a few days and, honestly, chose the town of Montepulciano as our next stop based merely on the obvious fact that it had given its name to the famous Italian wine. You need something to go on when navigating Tuscany, because no choice is a wrong one, every village is as intriguing as the last, a medieval ...

Temples of Finance: 6 Historical Sites that Made the World Go ‘Round

Contracts, borrowing, debt, business practices. These may not typically be words we care to ponder while traveling, but over the course of history they are just the things that helped forge some of the world's most fascinating places. From an early European mint to a once-massive Chinese bank to the home of one of the most famous banking families ...

The Balenciaga Museum and Fashion as Art

Fifteen miles west of San Sebastian along the coast of northern Spain’s Basque region sits a small fishing village called Getaria. When it is known, it’s for a couple of things: its Txakoli, a lightly sparkling white wine unique to the region and served in the charming seafood restaurants to be found in the old town; and as the birthplace of ...

4 Mexico City Museums for the Bucket List

Of the many things that struck me during a recent visit to Mexico City—the food, the traffic, the way art is woven so intricately into the city’s fabric—nothing made more of an impression than the museums. There are a staggering number of them, 150 or so, and I went to a lot, double digits, yet made only a dent. Mexico City has so many ...

The Hyatt Regency Mexico City: Best for the Business Traveler?

Mexico City’s version of the Hyatt Regency, housed in a 38-story high rise next door to a similarly composed Intercontinental, with a JW Marriott just down the block, is unlikely to figure in the typical tourist’s “Mexico City experience.” It provides none of that old-world feel you’d get from a hotel in the Centro Historico, or the ...

Rachel Cusk’s ‘Outline’: Incidental Athens

I visited Athens late last spring, just before Greece’s near-default on its debt and possible exit from the euro. At the time, the city exhibited no signs of near-collapse to the untrained eye (mine): The subways were running well, the Acropolis was open and packed, the restaurants and bars we frequented at night were buzzing. Underneath the ...

A Winter Guide to the Rockaways

[We updated this guide on January 15, 2017 to reflect notable openings and closings since last winter. Added: Rockaway Brewing Co., Beach Bistro 96, Whit's End at Riis Park. Removed: Playland Motel and Whit's End, Wild Feast] Out where Queens meets the ocean, the community of Rockaway welcomes almost 8 million beach-goers in the time between ...

The Lost Horse Saloon: At the Edge of Town and the Desert

Among its other more famous traits, Marfa, Texas is a hard-drinking town. Defiant and irreverent and, in a rare comingling, also friendly. Its remoteness means that the rules elsewhere don’t apply. Creativity trumps profitability. Interesting trumps sensible. And it’s so hard to get to, residents want to reward you once you arrive, eager to ...

Cat in a Buenos Aires Loft

Like many people in the fall of 2015, we found ourselves under the spell of a heatwave. A number of us had rented a four-bedroom palapa for a few days, up a hill from the beach town of San Augustinillo, in Mexico’s Oaxaca state. It had no air conditioning. By mid-morning each day, we’d make our way down to a modest open-air restaurant on the ...

On Holiday Travel: A Stumbling State of Mind

At roughly 7:15am, a quarter-mile-long line snaked out from security at La Guardia’s Gate D, turned a corner and continued on almost to the check-in counters, where we joined it. Half an hour later I could see the other side and began feeling the taste of my first coffee in the same way that, at the other end of a day, one might palpably feel ...

The Atlanta Hotel: A Refuge from the Many Elements

It came as a surprise to me when I touched down in Bangkok in 2009, traveling solo on the heels of a long-term relationship's demise, to find that I despised being in that city. My love for New York and Paris and Buenos Aires would not translate to this particular capital, with its cartoonish backpacker scene and, in other neighborhoods, overt ...

NYC Literary Haunts That Aren’t the Algonquin or White Horse Tavern

As followers in the footsteps of New York City's long list of boozy writers, we’ve been resting on our Algonquin and White Horse laurels for way too long. Those two bars barely scratch the surface of their particular genre, and yet they've assumed preeminence whenever someone asks for a recommendation of a classic literary watering hole. Here ...

6 Great Global Cities Made Affordable by the Strong Dollar

In global terms, it's a great time to be carrying greenbacks. The US dollar's strength against the euro has been on American travelers' radar for some time now, and they've been scooping up economical visits to Europe’s great cosmopolitan centers like Paris and Rome. But the American buck has been having a rip-roaring time of it against a number ...

The Lowdown on Mama Shelter Los Angeles

Prior to this year, the Mama Shelter brand already had five hugely popular hotels in Europe, all but one in France. They’d proven their model there: The draw of staying in a reasonably priced hotel with a ton of personality in a neighborhood in the early stages of buzzworthiness is strong, it turns out (and, by the way, not just among millenni...

Santorini –> Athens on Ryanair

In Flight Reviews, Flung writers provide key information about flights they take in order to leave the flying public better informed in an age of frustration, obfuscation and increasingly unfriendly skies.   JTR –> ATH on Ryanair Flight FR1233 Flight: FR1233 from Santorini to Athens Date and Time of Flight: June 5, 2015, 8:20 ...