Sarah Stodola

author-avatar

Sarah is the founder and editor of Flung, the author of Process: The Writing Lives of Great Authors, and a widely published travel and culture writer. Follow her on Twitter or Instagram.

Posts by Sarah Stodola 111 results

The Hyatt Regency Mexico City: Best for the Business Traveler?

Mexico City’s version of the Hyatt Regency, housed in a 38-story high rise next door to a similarly composed Intercontinental, with a JW Marriott just down the block, is unlikely to figure in the typical tourist’s “Mexico City experience.” It provides none of that old-world feel you’d get from a hotel in the Centro Historico, or the ...

Rachel Cusk’s ‘Outline’: Incidental Athens

I visited Athens late last spring, just before Greece’s near-default on its debt and possible exit from the euro. At the time, the city exhibited no signs of near-collapse to the untrained eye (mine): The subways were running well, the Acropolis was open and packed, the restaurants and bars we frequented at night were buzzing. Underneath the ...

A Winter Guide to the Rockaways

[We updated this guide on January 15, 2017 to reflect notable openings and closings since last winter. Added: Rockaway Brewing Co., Beach Bistro 96, Whit's End at Riis Park. Removed: Playland Motel and Whit's End, Wild Feast]Out where Queens meets the ocean, the community of Rockaway welcomes almost 8 million beach-goers in the time between ...

The Lost Horse Saloon: At the Edge of Town and the Desert

Among its other more famous traits, Marfa, Texas is a hard-drinking town. Defiant and irreverent and, in a rare comingling, also friendly. Its remoteness means that the rules elsewhere don’t apply. Creativity trumps profitability. Interesting trumps sensible. And it’s so hard to get to, residents want to reward you once you arrive, eager to ...

Cat in a Buenos Aires Loft

Like many people in the fall of 2015, we found ourselves under the spell of a heatwave. A number of us had rented a four-bedroom palapa for a few days, up a hill from the beach town of San Augustinillo, in Mexico’s Oaxaca state. It had no air conditioning. By mid-morning each day, we’d make our way down to a modest open-air restaurant on the ...

On Holiday Travel: A Stumbling State of Mind

At roughly 7:15am, a quarter-mile-long line snaked out from security at La Guardia’s Gate D, turned a corner and continued on almost to the check-in counters, where we joined it. Half an hour later I could see the other side and began feeling the taste of my first coffee in the same way that, at the other end of a day, one might palpably feel ...

The Atlanta Hotel: A Refuge from the Many Elements

It came as a surprise to me when I touched down in Bangkok in 2009, traveling solo on the heels of a long-term relationship's demise, to find that I despised being in that city. My love for New York and Paris and Buenos Aires would not translate to this particular capital, with its cartoonish backpacker scene and, in other neighborhoods, overt ...

NYC Literary Haunts That Aren’t the Algonquin or White Horse Tavern

As followers in the footsteps of New York City's long list of boozy writers, we’ve been resting on our Algonquin and White Horse laurels for way too long. Those two bars barely scratch the surface of their particular genre, and yet they've assumed preeminence whenever someone asks for a recommendation of a classic literary watering hole. Here ...

6 Great Global Cities Made Affordable by the Strong Dollar

In global terms, it's a great time to be carrying greenbacks. The US dollar's strength against the euro has been on American travelers' radar for some time now, and they've been scooping up economical visits to Europe’s great cosmopolitan centers like Paris and Rome. But the American buck has been having a rip-roaring time of it against a number ...

The Lowdown on Mama Shelter Los Angeles

Prior to this year, the Mama Shelter brand already had five hugely popular hotels in Europe, all but one in France. They’d proven their model there: The draw of staying in a reasonably priced hotel with a ton of personality in a neighborhood in the early stages of buzzworthiness is strong, it turns out (and, by the way, not just among millenni...

Santorini –> Athens on Ryanair

In Flight Reviews, Flung writers provide key information about flights they take in order to leave the flying public better informed in an age of frustration, obfuscation and increasingly unfriendly skies.  JTR –> ATH on Ryanair Flight FR1233 Flight: FR1233 from Santorini to AthensDate and Time of Flight: June 5, 2015, 8:20 ...

LA Desaturated: The Black Cat in Silver Lake

There may be no finer hour in life to sidle up to a long wooden bar than mid-afternoon on a weekday, a time during which we seldom allow ourselves the pleasure, for obvious reasons having to do with slippery slopes. Only when we are traveling does the opportunity present itself unaccompanied by guilt. Entire destinations (Las Vegas, for one) have ...

Among the Very Tall

The drive into Waikiki from the Honolulu Airport takes us first along the city’s notoriously clogged freeways, victims initially of bad design and later an undercalculated influx of people and cars. Stopping, then going, crawling then picking up speed, the torture-device boredom of automobile travel finally sedates us and we sink further, into ...

Home and Away: Patti Smith’s M Train

A recurring dream about a cowpoke with an earthy wit would not seem the best topic with which to open a memoir. And as expected, it makes for an inauspicious beginning to Patti Smith’s latest book, M Train. It’s not so easy writing about nothing, the cowpoke says to her as she enters the dream, and I braced for the worst. Luckily, the book ...

The Decades Collide at Chez Jeannette

We Americans can never get over Parisians’ aptitude for a drifting hour spent sitting at a café, drinking, smoking, talking when the mood strikes, which is often. We want to do it, too, and we try, when we visit Paris. We forego everything that’s been reinforced in us since our school days about the straight line between hard work and ...

A Closer Look at the Broad Museum in LA

Getting into the newly opened Broad Museum in downtown Los Angeles takes some forethought, something I discovered almost too late during a weeklong trip to Los Angeles this September. The free advance timed tickets available via the website were long since fully booked by the time I checked. I called the museum to see about alternatives, and was ...

The Viceroy Anguilla: Hedge Funders and Honeymooners

To get to the Viceroy resort on the tiny Caribbean island of Anguilla, I flew first from New York to St. Maarten, where the closest sizable airport is located. During the flight, I sat next to a family of four, each member bursting with the pent-up excitement of an imminent vacation. As we chatted, I learned that the husband/dad worked on Wall ...

LA’s Frogtown, on the Cusp of Change

The Spoke Bicycle Cafe sits on the last lot of the last block of a dead-end Los Angeles street. It can be remarkably sunny here, in a way that makes your eyes hurt. The street stops at a chain-link fence, bringing what little traffic exists here to an abrupt halt. Street parking is generally not a problem. The day of my visit, in fact, I was the ...

Spain’s Unsung Summer Cocktail: Tinto de Verano

The scene was: My mother and I, sitting at an outdoor café in Seville, Spain, taking a breather from a late morning of wandering that had bled into the noon hour on a blistering September day. Yes we did want something refreshing and boozy, but we were also held back by the prospect of all that wandering still looming ahead of us. The waiter saw ...

Saturini: From Hinterland to Hordes in the Greek Isles

Arriving by boat to Santorini, the theatrical C-shaped island in Greece’s Aegean Sea, means first entering the strange purgatory of the port, which of course sits at sea level, 1,200 feet below the villages atop the cliffs that everyone is here to see. Our boat pulled in in the early afternoon of a sunny but hazy day. Even before hitting land, ...